Section 17: Terrible, Terrible, Terrible at Temple

Quinn Cook couldn't stop Temple's guard play, either. (Photo via BluePlanetShots.com)

So, the title of this article, I believe, is commensurate with what Coach K must have told this team as they evaporated, like so many pitiful ghosts, into the recesses of the Wells Fargo Center as Temple fans (and this idiot) rushed the court. Temple earned this victory with some incredible playmaking. They managed to outrebound a much bigger team, overcome a number of valiant comeback attempts, and make enough free throws to seal the victory.

But Duke let the Owls have the game. Our disastrous execution, defense, decision making and teamwork was simply terrible, terrible, terrible.

Here are my thoughts, broken down into positives and negatives. Let’s do those negatives first, since most of them are still burned onto my retinas.

The Bad

Amber Alert for our veteran guards. Especially Mr. Andre Dawkins. We all love the kid, but he’s off in another world right now, and hasn’t found his place on this team. In 19 minutes, he scored no points, took three shots and got a single rebound. He fouled once. Where’s his head? Where’s the passion for the game he showed as a freshman, when he demanded the ball against Baylor and hit two huge threes? Right now, he’s as useful as four Wear twins on the court.

Seth Curry was similarly disappointing, particularly considering he’s supposed to be the leader of this team. Sure, he had four steals, but he also committed five turnovers, usually while trying to do something he’s just not capable of: being a big game point guard. He’s just not. He was never meant to be a point guard. Since Thornton has proved incapable of replacing Irving and Smith and Quinn Cook is–what, too young?–Curry has been thrust into a role with which he’s struggling mightily. If Duke wants to make a stink beyond February, we need a real point guard. By any means necessary. Just figure it out. Cook might be the best option if he can play enough to get comfortable leading the team.

So. Direct message to Quinn Cook. You have proved to be the most canny and competent point guard on the team. But, dude, stop shooting threes. Especially contested threes, or threes shot after two seconds of hesitation, or 25-foot threes. Because that’s your m.o. right now, and it’s not ideal. Be a distributor, get in the lane and find slashers. That’s what you’re good at! That’s what you were taught at Oak Hill and Dematha and that’s what you’re learning here, I hope, from all those former Duke PG assistant coaches over on the bench. Because Kyrie Irving may be the hero Duke deserves, but it’s not the one it needs right now. We need someone more in the mold of John Stockton.

If we are comparing defenses to wines, Duke’s was two buck Chuck against Temple. A sloshy combination of nonsensical on-ball defending and terrible helpside defense, a conflagration of elements that leave a horrible taste in your mouth. Pure laziness, like how Two Buck Chuck is what you drink if you’re tired, lazy and broke. You’d think that we would try to defend against Juan Fernandez’s behind the back pass after he did it once, right? Wrong.

I don’t know how many times we needed to hear Jimmy Dykes talk about it*, but we’re not going anywhere if we have more turnovers than assists. Team assist to turnover ratio, I guess? Against Temple it was 13 assists to 16 turnovers. Many of those TO’s were the result of ill-advised drives by Curry and Austin Rivers. (Rivers, by the way, reverted back to his November self, shooting 3-11 and telegraphing all of his drives like Samuel Morse). This goes back to the yawning chasm of a point guard situation, but Duke players are supposed to be smarter than that.

Also, screw the black jerseys, a topic which bring us to the tweet of the night from ESPN announcer and Boston College alumnus  John “Boog” Sciambi.

[blackbirdpie url=”https://twitter.com/#!/BoogSciambi/status/154722592077512704″%5D

 

The Good

I’m going to keep this brief. Thanks, Plumlees, for making this game at least somewhat competitive. You combined for 33 points and 16 rebounds (basically equalling the performance of one Kevin Love on an average night). Sure, Mason and Miles missed some layups in the final five minutes that would have cut the Owl lead further, but hey, they’re not supposed to be the best finishers. Wait, yes they are. Forget it, I’m not going down that road, it might lead me to talk about Ryan Kelly’s godawful performance, and I just can’t do it right now.

Thanks, Josh Hairston, for knowing your role and only shooting once in the game. Let’s keep it that way, yes?

Thanks, Michael Gbinije, for making both of your shots and not turning the ball over. Gold star. You should get more playing time because you clearly have a firm sense of what you can do on the court. Can you teach the rest of the team?

The Crazie

So I have a simple solution that might help us going forward into ACC play, starting Saturday at Georgia Tech.

This team needs to get mad. I mean fiery mad, Kim Jong-Il at the rest of the world mad, Michelle Bachmann at Newt Gingrich mad, Colin Cowherd at Virginia football mad, Jim Everett at Jim Rome mad. No more demure, “why me?” gazes from Curry and Dawkins when something goes wrong. No more Plumlee nice guys. I want Marshall on the bench in war paint, even if he might be redshirted for the next three years. I want Quinn Cook ripping off his jersey to reveal “COME AT ME BRO” scrawled in Sharpie on his chest. I want this team to play bloodsport. With pride. Like they have nothing to lose.

In the locker room, maybe Coach K will play the Howard Beale video (below) before every practice. When Mason misses a rotation, Miles should be in his face, screaming “I’M MAD AS HELL, AND I’M NOT GONNA TAKE IT ANYMORE!” Likewise when Rivers forces an impossible drive, when Seth Curry drops his head after getting the ball stripped, and when Andre Dawkins looks like he wants to quit basketball forever.

We need to get mad. Otherwise, UNC might coast to the ACC title and the world will end in December.**

Go Duke.

 

*Answer: None. None times. I never want to hear Jimmy Dykes speak again in my life.

**Basically, those two scenarios are the same.

Looking Back To Move Forward

Good teams win games, but great teams can bounce back from a tough loss, and I’ll speak for the entire Crazies community by saying we can file last week’s game in Columbus under the “tough loss” category. Taking 20-point defeats is not something that the Duke Blue Devils are used to, but luckily for us, Colorado State is coming to town tonight.

We can take away many negatives and a few positives away from the Ohio State game, some of which I discussed in my post yesterday. But there is one thing I’m sure we can all agree on—in order to get back to form and elevate itself to the next level, this Duke team needs a change. Luckily for us, the guy calling the shots for this team knows just a few things about basketball. Although he has not found himself in this situation many times throughout his illustrious career, Coach K has a knack for responding to a blowout loss with an adjustment that alters the identity of the team, and when Coach K responds, the team responds as well. Let’s take a look back to some similar situations Duke teams have found itself in over the last few years to examine the adjustments we might see tonight against Colorado State.

Nolan Smith shot 1-for-7 against Clemson and was subsequently pulled from the starting lineup (photo courtesy of DukeBluePlanet)

The Game: February 4, 2009—Clemson 74, Duke 47
What Went Wrong: In a word…everything. Duke couldn’t throw a shot into the ocean during this game, shooting a miserable 30.8% from the field. Kyle Singler, Nolan Smith, and Jon Scheyer, who would eventually lead the Blue Devils to a national championship the next season, shot a combined 4-23. Meanwhile, Duke had no answer for Clemson’s Trevor Booker, who shot 8-for-10 from the floor en route to 21 points and eight rebounds.
How Coach K Adjusted: Finding themselves in a similar situation as this year’s Blue Devils, with no true point guard to speak of, Greg Paulus assumed the role in Duke’s next game, starting in favor of Nolan Smith. Krzyzewski also used a significantly smaller rotation in this game, with only six Blue Devils playing more than 7 minutes in the contest.
The Result: Despite going in down 32-19 at the half, Duke came back to win an overtime thriller at Cameron by a score of 78-75. Miami’s Jack McClinton scored a game-high 34 points in a herculean effort, while Paulus added 18 points in his first game at point guard. Duke’s shooting woes continued, however, as Kyle Singler scored 17 points but at the expense of a 5-for-23 shooting effort. Overall, Duke would go on to lose its next two games following Miami, but was able to finish 8-1 down the stretch en route to an ACC Tournament championship. The team would fall earn a #2 seed in the NCAA Tournament and fall in the Sweet 16 to #3 seed Villanova.

Kyle Singler's 18 points were not enough against the Hoyas (photo courtesy of DukeBluePlanet)

The Game: January 30, 2010—Georgetown 89, Duke 77
What Went Wrong: Georgetown shot an obscene 71.7% from the field as Lance Thomas and Miles Plumlee’s shoddy interior defense allowed the Hoyas’ Greg Monroe, Chris Wright, and Austin Freeman to attack the rim and score at will. Duke once again relied too heavily on its outside shooting and was only able to muster 9-of-29 from three-point land. President Obama watched on at the Verizon Center as Georgetown pushed its lead to 23 late in the second half, before a mini Duke run allowed the final score to look slightly more respectable.
How Coach K Adjusted: Brian Zoubek, who played only two minutes against Georgetown, saw his playing time increase to 13 minutes in Duke’s next contest, an 86-67 victory over a ranked Georgia Tech squad. Zoubek continued to put in quality minutes in the team’s ensuing games and replaced Miles Plumlee in the starting lineup three games later, when he played the best game of his Duke career with 16 points and 17 rebounds in a 77-56 rout of Maryland.
The Result: We all know how this story ended, as Zoubek started for the rest of the season, playing a crucial role as Duke went on to win 18 of its final 19 games en route to its fourth national championship.

St. Johns had its way with the Blue Devils, but Duke got the last laugh come March (photo courtesy of DukeBluePlanet)

The Game: January 30, 2011—St. John’s 93, Duke 78
What Went Wrong: Playing at Madison Square Garden, the Red Storm certainly had a home court advantage and didn’t waste any time, jumping on the Blue Devils early and often. As the lead ballooned to 21 points at the half, the Johnnies continued to coast, not allowing Duke to cut the lead to less than 13 for the rest of the game. The Blue Devils were too reliant on their three-point shooting early in the game, and fell behind as the shots were not falling. Faced with a large deficit, Duke had to rely on long range shooting in the second half in hopes of a comeback, but its struggles continued from beyond the arc, knocking down just 5-of-26 three-point attempts on the afternoon.
How Coach K Adjusted: Tyler Thornton replaced Seth Curry in Duke’s next game at Maryland as the Blue Devils sought to shift their focus from three-point shooting to defense and efficiency in their half-court sets.
The Result: Duke held firm control over an inexperienced Maryland team throughout the contest, coasting to an 80-62 win. Kyle Singler and Nolan Smith led the team with 22 and 21 points, respectively, while Mason Plumlee added an impressive 12 points and 11 rebounds on 6-of-7 shooting. Duke would go on to post an 11-2 record to close out the season with yet another ACC Tournament title before falling in the Sweet 16 to Arizona.

And here we are. Following a performance in Columbus that couldn’t even qualify as subpar, Duke faces yet another critical juncture in its season. If there is any time for new life to be breathed into this Blue Devils team, it is now. Despite minor tests against Temple, Florida State, and upstart Virginia over the ensuing weeks, Duke certainly won’t be considered an underdog in any game it plays before its February 8th matchup with “the-team-who-must-not-be-named” in Chapel Hill. Although following last week’s beatdown at the hands of the Buckeyes this year’s matchup at Carolina looks especially daunting, if this team can make the necessary adjustments and hit its stride, we could be looking at one of the games of the year in college basketball.

Michael Gbinije saw increased playing time against Ohio State, scoring these two points on a fast break (photo courtesy of DukeBluePlanet)

The only question now is, what will be Krzyzewski’s adjustment this time around? It almost certainly will include some sort of a change in tomorrow night’s starting lineup, though it is not particularly clear as to who will be inserted. The most likely to be pulled from the starting lineup following last week’s debacle appear to be Ryan Kelly and Andre Dawkins, both of whom played quite poorly and sat nearly the entire second half. Although Kelly has not always been reliable defensively (which is where Duke clearly got burned against Ohio State), I think the clear choice is to pull Dawkins. If you’ve been keeping up with our statistical analyses using advanced metrics, you’ll see that despite his weak showing last week, Kelly has been the most consistent offensive weapon on this year’s Duke team. Who is inserted into the starting lineup is a bit more up in the air, however. What Duke is lacking right now is the presence of a big wing player who can defend on the perimeter. As of now the only person on the roster that fits that role is Michael Gbinije, who saw more minutes against Ohio State than he had all year and put forth a decent effort. But I still question whether at this point in the year Gbinije is ready to take on a starting role, so I would say the more likely option is to see Quinn Cook or Tyler Thornton tomorrow night. Putting a true point guard out there will provide more stability on offense, and Thornton’s defense would surely be appreciated to make sure nobody can ever replicate Aaron Craft’s performance from last week again. If I were a betting man, I would say Thornton starts in place of Dawkins, but I would not be surprised to see any of these three in the starting lineup tonight.

Luckily for the Blue Devils, Colorado State does not pose a particularly tough test, so it should have plenty of opportunities to try different combinations of players and work to improve on some of the weaknesses from last week. Let’s hope history repeats itself and the adjustments pay off. Stay Crazie, my friends.

Happy Thanksgiving, Duke Fans!

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Crazie-Talk!

Enjoy your holiday, we’ll be back soon with a recap of last night’s thrilling win over Kansas and thoughts on our upcoming game against #3 Ohio State. Until then, enjoy another photo of Tyler Thornton and the highlights from GoDuke.com.

This man is a surprise assassin. Don't be fooled, Jayhawks. (Photo via GoDuke.com)

Section 17: Duke Trumps Volunteers, Set Up Rematch with Michigan

Courtesy of DukeBluePlanet.com

Austin Rivers d's up. He had 18 points in the game. (Photo via BluePlanetShots.com)

Through four games, Duke looked like a talented team without a fixed identity. We escaped against Belmont by one point at home, and many fans in Cameron gaped in bewilderment. We looked ready to roll against Michigan State before the Spartans cut a double digit lead to 5 by the buzzer. Davidson had a fantastic first half before the Plumlee connection overcame the Wildcats in the second half. Blue Devil fans, including the Crazie-Talk cadre, were never sure of victory despite the high level of talent on this team.

And so we went to Maui, where we faced off against upstart coach Cuonzo Martin’s Tennessee Volunteers in the quarterfinals. The Vols have had their fair share of scandal in the past year, with formerly lauded coach Bruce Pearl dismissed at the end of last season. The new look Tennessee squad never truly backed down; their lack of organization and a tendency to take bad shots doomed them against Duke, but they were athletic and feisty through Monday’s 40 minutes. Duke finally got it together in the final eight minutes of action, pulling away to a 77-67 victory in the Lahaina Civic Center, where we have never lost in four previous Maui Invitationals.

Here are some of my observations from the night.

  • Our three point defense against the Vols was fantastic. Tennessee took eight shots from beyond the arc and connected on none of them. I attribute this to our ball-hawking perimeter defense. This facet of our defensive strategy is both a gift and a curse: we often pressure shooters at the expense of dribble penetration. The Vols were more keen on taking shots closer to the bucket anyway–they shot 50 times from within the arc and collected 10 offensive rebounds. However, Tennessee is not a bad outside shooting team. Even after tonight, the team shoots threes at a 49.1% clip. If Coach K is comfortable funneling shooters to the paint and protecting the three point arc, let’s hope our big men can handle it against better teams in the future.
  • Ryan Kelly is our most consistent offensive player. The White Raven has proven his mettle this year, quietly of course. The Raleigh native doesn’t burn up in a blaze of glory, he simmers like a tender pot roast (Thanksgiving metaphors!). Against Tennessee, he had 17 points and six rebounds–a ho hum night for a star player, but a testament to Kelly’s skill at taking what comes to him. Yesterday, we wrote about Kelly’s incredible effective field goal percentage, and he continued that trend against the Vols. Kelly shot 5-9 from the field, made five of six free throws and two threes. His buckets came at important times in the game, too. With about four minutes to go, Kelly was on the finishing end of a Seth Curry alley oop that permanently shifted momentum in the game to the Devils. As Curry recovered the loose ball, Kelly saw the play developing and made the smartest possible play: a cut to the basket and a call for the ball. It’s no secret that Kelly is one of the smartest players on the Duke team–he had extremely high SAT scores and studies in the demanding Sanford School of Public Policy. As a junior captain, he has shown his ability to lead Duke to wins in competitive games. I’m glad the White Raven is flying with Duke.
  • Mason Plumlee and Austin Rivers showed flashes of offensive brilliance, but just flashes. Mason and Austin are the most hyped players on the team this year, mostly because of their NBA potential (never mind that Curry and Kelly are the most productive, of course). Monday night was up and down for each of these studs. Rivers took several boneheaded shots in the first half, killing Duke momentum and allowing Tennessee easy transition opportunities. Plum2 was 3-5 from the field, but showed a tendency to dribble himself into trouble with his back to the basket. In the second half, each player had fantastic finishes: Mason’s left handed finish and one and Rivers’ many floaters come to mind. Both Mason and Austin have oodles of ability, and since K is the master of November, he will find ways to help each player grow as the season progresses, even when making mistakes. Certainly both will have to be more efficient if we plan to go deep in March. Luckily, March is months away.
  • Free throw shooting needs work. 18-27 will not cut it when we start conference play. Oh wait, the ACC still sucks. Still, though.
  • The backup PG duo of Thornton and Cook were up and down, but I believe in them. Thornton, our requisite defensive stopper, bodied up against Tennessee’s best player, Trae Golden. He fouled out. Cook posted a eclectic line of two points, two boards, a steal, a block and an assist. He did seem a little bit out of control, though, and only was on the floor for eight minutes. Many have made the observation that “Duke plays better” with Thornton on the floor, and that is usually true of the sophomore. Cook is still recovering from a knee injury and will surely grow as a guard as the season goes on. So, let’s just wait to see what happens for these two guys.
  • Rebounding can be better. Chalk some of it up to Tennessee’s wildly inconsistent shot selection, but they had 10 offensive boards to our eight, and outrebounded us 34-33 overall. This should not happen when we have three upperclassmen 6’10” or taller.

Tonight, we face off with a surging Michigan Wolverines squad who handily beat favored Memphis yesterday. Duke-Michigan carries heavy historical connotations, which were reignited last season by Jalen Rose’s foolish “Uncle Tom” comments about Duke legend Grant Hill. Then we barely escaped from Michigan in the NCAA second round, saved only by Kyrie Irving’s late game floater. Michigan has already beaten Duke once this year by securing the commitment of coveted high school senior Mitch McGary. The Wolverines, true to their mascot, will be out for blood against Duke for all these reasons. There shall be fireworks.

We’ll be back with another liveblog of tomorrow’s action; tipoff should be around  7 PM on ESPN. Thanks to all of those who participated in last night’s liveblog, by the way.

See you at 7PM. Go Duke.

Bonus footage: Highlights from Duke’s most recent Maui championship from DBP in 2008. Whoa, remember Greg Paulus?!? Whoa, remember Taylor “2 packs a day” King? Well, we are now 13-0 in the event.

Correction appended 11/23/11: Tyler Thornton is a sophomore, not a junior. Whoops.